Virtually Speaking Podcast Episode #174: vSphere with Tanzu

I’m sure most readers are now aware that we now have 2 versions of what was initially called “Project Pacific” at VMworld 2019. Our initial release with vSphere 7.0 (vSphere with Kubernetes) was only available with VCF & NSX-T. However, with the release of vSphere 7.0U1, whilst we continue to have VCF with Tanzu, there is a new version outside of VCF called vSphere with Tanzu. I have written about how to get started with this new version, from covering the prerequisites, deploying a HA-Proxy, enabling vSphere with Tanzu Workload Management and deploying your first TKG ‘guest’ cluster. In this…

Deploying Tanzu Kubernetes “guest” cluster in vSphere with Tanzu

In this final installment of my “vSphere with Tanzu” posts, we are going to look at how to create our very first Tanzu Kubernetes (TKG) guest cluster. In previous posts, we have compared vSphere with Tanzu to VCF with Tanzu, and covered the prerequisites. Then we looked at the steps involved in deploying the HA-Proxy to provide a load balancer service to vSphere with Tanzu. In my most recent post, we looked at the steps involved in enabling workload management. Now that all of that is in place, we are finally able to go ahead and deploy a TKG cluster,…

Failed to deploy PV to local volume – “No compatible datastore found for storagePolicy”

This is something that I “spun my wheels” on a little bit last week, so I decided I’d write a short article to explain the issue in a bit more detail. This is related to the provisioning of a Persistent Volume on the Supervisor cluster of a vSphere with Kubernetes deployment. I had a local VMFS volume on one of my hosts, so I went ahead and tagged the volume using vSphere Tagging. I then built a tag-based storage policy so that when that policy is selected for provisioning, the objects that get provisioned would be placed on that local,…

Helm Chart for vSphere CSI driver

After recently presenting on the topic of the vSphere CSI driver, I received feedback from a number of different people that the current install mechanism is a little long-winder and prone to error. The request was for a Helm Chart to make things a little easier. I spoke to a few people about this internally, and while we have some long term plans to make this process easier, we didn’t have any plans in the short term. At that point, I reached out to my colleague and good pal, Myles Gray, and we decided we would try to create our…

Encrypting Kubernetes Persistent Volumes on vSphere (Video)

In this video, we look at how to create a Storage Policy Based Management (SPBM) with the VM Encryption feature which can be used with vSphere CSI/CNS to create a Kubernetes Storage Class that encrypts Persistent Volumes. This feature is only available with the CSI 2.0 driver for native, upstream Kubernetes deployed on vSphere 7.0 (at the time of writing). You will also need to have a Key Management Server available to the vSphere host to create a policy that allows encryption. Finally, encrypted Persistent Volumes can only be attached to encrypted virtual machines, meaning that at least one of…

Cloud Native Storage (CNS) in vSphere with Kubernetes/Tanzu (Video)

A short video explaining the role of the vSphere CSI (Container Storage Interface) driver and CNS (Cloud Native Storage) in both the vSphere with Kubernetes/Tanzu Supervisor Cluster and in the Tanzu Kubernetes Grid (TKG) Guest Cluster. This video discusses the role of the CSI driver in the Supervisor cluster, and the pvCSI driver (para-virtual CSI driver) in the TKG guest cluster. We also look at how the pvCSI communicates CNS control plane in the vCenter Server via the CSI driver in the Supervisor Cluster to request Persistent Volume operations on behalf of the Guest Cluster.

vSAN File Services and Cloud Native Storage integration (Video)

In this short video, I want to show some of the integration points between vSAN 7.0 File Services, and Cloud Native Storage (CNS). We will use the CSI driver that ships with vSphere 7.0 to provision a new read-write-many persistent volume backed by a vSAN file share. A read-write-many persistent volume is one that can be accessed by multiple Kubernetes Pods simultaneously. I will then show how CNS provides the vSphere client all sorts of useful information about the volume. This information is invaluable to a vSphere Admin when trying to figure out how vSphere storage is being consumed when…