vSphere 7.0, Cloud Native Storage, CSI and offline volume extend

Another new feature added to the vSphere CSI driver in the vSphere 7.0 release is the ability to offline extend / grow a Kubernetes Persistent Volume (PV). This requires a special directive to be added to the StorageClass and, as per the title, the operation must be done offline whilst the PV is detached from any Pod. Let’s take a closer look at the steps involved. New CSI component – CSI Resizer To enable resizing operations, a new component has been added to the vSphere CSI Controller called csi-resizer. We can examine the csi-resizer and other components associated with the…

vSphere 7.0, Cloud Native Storage, CSI and encryption support

A common request we’ve had for the vSphere CSI (Container Storage Interface) driver is to support encryption of Kubernetes Persistent Volumes using the vSphere feature called VMcrypt. Although we’ve had VM encryption since vSphere 6.5, this was a feature that we could not support in the first version of the CSI driver that we shipped with vSphere 6.7U3. However, I’m pleased to announce that we can now support this feature with the new CSI driver shipping with vSphere 7.0. The reason we can support it in vSphere 7.0 is that First Class Disks, also known as Improved Virtual Disks, now…

vSphere 7.0, Cloud Native Storage, CSI and vVols support

With the release of vSphere 7.0, we also announced enhancements to our Cloud Native Storage (CNS) offering. One of the new features that we now offer in vSphere 7.0 is the ability to provision Virtual Volumes (vVols) to back Kubernetes Persistent Volumes (PVs) via our updated version of the vSphere Container Storage Interface (CSI) driver. In this post, I will walk through the steps involved in consuming vVols via Kubernetes manifest files when dynamically provisioning PVs. I will also show some enhancements to our CNS UI in vSphere 7.0 so that you can easily identify vVol backed PVs. Step 1…

Building a TKG Cluster in vSphere with Kubernetes

Now that we have our vSphere with Kubernetes deployed, we take the next logical step in this post and deploy a Tanzu Kubernetes Grid (TKG) guest cluster. [Update] Whilst guest cluster isn’t an official name for the Tanzu Kubernetes cluster, I’ll use it in this post to differentiate it from the Supervisor cluster deployed with vSphere with Kubernetes. TKG is a full CNCF certified Kubernetes distribution. It is deployed as a set of virtual machines, in accordance with a TanzuKubernetesCluster manifest which we will look at later. The OS and K8s distribution is also specified in the manifest. There may…

A first look at vSphere with Kubernetes in action

In my previous post on VCF 4.0, we looked at the steps involved in deploying vSphere with Kubernetes in a Workload Domain (WLD). When we completed that step, we had rolled out the Supervisor Control Plane VMs, and installed the Spherelet components which allows our ESXi hosts to behave as Kubernetes worker nodes. Let’s now take a closer look at that configuration, and I will show you a few simple Kubernetes operations to get you started on the Supervisor Cluster in vSphere with Kubernetes. Disclaimer: “Like my earlier posts, I want to be clear, this post is based on a…

Read-Write-Many Persistent Volumes with vSAN 7 File Services

A few weeks back, just after the vSphere 7.0 launch event, I wrote an article about Native File Services in vSAN 7.0. I had a few questions asking why we decided on NFS support in this initial release, and not something like SMB or some other protocol. The reason is quite straight-forward. We are positioning vSAN as a platform for both traditional virtual machine workloads and newer containerized workloads. We chose NFS to address a storage requirement in Kubernetes, namely a way to share Persistent Volumes between Pods. To date, the vSphere CSI driver only provisioned block based Persistent Volumes…

Native File Services for vSAN 7

On March 10th 2020, we saw a plethora of VMware announcements around vSphere 7.0, vSAN 7.0, VMware Cloud Foundation 4.0 and of course the Tanzu portfolio. The majority of these announcements tie in very deeply with the overall VMware company vision which is any application on any cloud on any device. Those applications have traditionally been virtualized applications. Now we are turning our attention to newer, modern applications which are predominantly container based, and predominantly run on Kubernetes. Our aim is to build a platform which can build, run, manage, connect and protect both traditional virtualized applications and modern containerized…