VSAN 6.2 Part 2 – RAID-5 and RAID-6 configurations

Those of you familiar with VSAN will be aware that when it comes to virtual machine deployments, historically, objects on the VSAN datastore were deployed either as a RAID-0 (stripe) or a RAID-1 (mirror) or a combination of both. From a capacity perspective, this was quite an overhead. For instance, if I wanted my VM to tolerate 1 failure, I need two copies of the data. If I wanted my VM to tolerate 2 failures, I needed three copies of the data and if I wanted my VM to tolerate the maximum number of failures, which is 3, then I…

VSAN 6.2 Part 1 – Deduplication and Compression

Now that VSAN 6.2 is officially launched, it is time to start discussing some of the new features that we have introduced into our latest version of Virtual SAN. Possibly one of the most eagerly anticipated feature is the introduction of deduplication and compression, two space efficiency techniques that will reduce the overall storage consumption of the applications running in virtual machines on Virtual SAN. Of course, this also lowers the economics of running an all-flash VSAN, and opens up all-flash VSAN to multiple use cases.

An overview of the new Virtual SAN 6.2 features

If you were wondering why my blogging has dropped off in recent months, wonder no more. I’ve been fully immersed in the next release of VSAN. Today VMware has just announced the launch of VSAN 6.2, the next version of VMware’s Virtual SAN product. It is almost 2.5 years since we launched the VSAN beta at VMworld 2013, and almost 2 years to the day since we officially GA’ed our first release of VSAN way back in March 2014. A lot has happened since then, with 3 distinct releases in that 2 year period (6.0, 6.1 and now 6.2). For…

Monitoring and Metrics in VMware Data Services Manager v1.4

VMware Data Services Manager (DSM) v1.4 has a substantial amount of built-in monitoring, not just for analyzing the health and behaviour of the vSphere environments where the databases are running, but also the databases themselves. In this post, I will highlight what those metrics are, and where to find them in the Provider UI. We will begin by looking at the ‘Environment’ monitoring and metrics, before turning our attention to the ‘Database’. Environment The first interesting view of an environment is the Health. This view shows us the health of the agent, and whether any of the major components that…

A closer look at the vSphere with Tanzu Namespace Service

Now that vSphere 7.0U3c is available, I thought it might be a good time to revisit some of the vSphere with Tanzu features that have appeared in recent editions. The first of these is the Namespace Service, which enables dev-ops personas to create their own Supervisor Namespaces through the command line via kubectl. We have extended this feature in vSphere 7.0U3c to allow dev-ops to add their own Kubernetes labels and annotations. Let’s take a look at how this works, and how the vSphere Administrator can put guardrails around the amount of vSphere resources this persona can consume when creating…

TKG v1.4 LDAP (Active Directory) integration with Pinniped and Dex

LDAP integration with Pinniped and Dex is a topic that I have written about before, particularly with TKG v1.3. However, recently I had reason to deploy TKG v1.4 and noticed some nice new enhancements around LDAP integration that I thought it worthwhile highlighting. One is the fact that you no longer need to have a web browser available in the environment where you are configuring LDAP credentials which was a requirement is the previous version. In this post, I will deploy a TKG v1.4 management cluster on vSphere. This environment uses the NSX ALB to provide IP addresses for both…

Network Policies in Tanzu Mission Control revisited

Earlier this month, I had my first look at network policies in Tanzu Mission Control (TMC). This earlier post looked at a very simple network policy where I used a web server app, and showed how we could control access to it from other pods by using labels. In this post, I wanted to do something that is a bit more detailed. For the purposes of this test, I will use a pod based NFS server, and then control access to it from other pods who wish to mount the NFS file share from the server pod. I have already…