vSAN File Service & Kubernetes PVs with an implicit quota

Earlier this week, I participated in a customer call around vSAN File Service and Kubernetes Persistent Volumes. I have highlighted the dynamic Read-Write-Many Persistent Volume feature of our vSphere CSI driver in conjunction with vSAN File Service before. Read-Write-Many (RWX) volumes are volumes that can be accessed/shared by multiple containers. During the discussion, one question came up in relation to quota, and if it can be applied to Persistent Volumes which are backed by file shares from vSAN File Service, which is the purpose of this post. Now, for those of you who are familiar with vSAN File Service, you…

govc object.collect – An essential tool for govmomi developers

A while back, I was looking at ways that I could query vSphere resources and inventory using the Go language. My end goal was to develop a prototype Kubernetes Operator to extend Kubernetes so that a developer or K8s cluster admin could query vSphere resources and inventory from the kubectl interface. While the Go language itself has lots of code examples online, and is relatively intuitive to a novice programmer like myself, I struggled quite a bit with getting to grips with govmomi, the Go library for interacting with the VMware vSphere API. In particular, I had difficultly in trying…

A first look at vSphere VM Service

In this post, we will take a look at a brand new service that is now available in vSphere with Tanzu, called the vSphere VM Service. This new services enables developers to create virtual machines on vSphere Infrastructure via Kubernetes YAML manifests, just like they would create Tanzu Kubernetes clusters via the TKG service, or PodVMs via the Pod service, both of which are already available in vSphere with Tanzu. Since we feel that many applications will be made up of both containers and VMs, this is the first step in enabling developers to create these multi-faceted applications via the…

CSI Topology – Configuration How-To

In this post, we will look at another feature of the vSphere CSI driver that enables the placement of Kubernetes objects on different vSphere environments using a combination of vSphere Tags and a feature of the CSI driver called topology or failure domains. To achieve this, some additional entries must be added to the vSphere CSI driver configuration file. The CSI driver discovers each Kubernetes node/virtual machine topology, and through the kubelet, adds them as labels to the nodes. Please note that at the time of writing, the volume topology and availability zone feature was still in beta with vSphere…

vSphere CSI v2.2 – Online Volume Expansion

The vSphere CSI driver version 2.2 has just released. One of the features I was looking forward to in this release is the inclusion of Online Volume Expansion. While volume expansion was in earlier releases, it was always an offline operation. In other words, you have to detach the volume from the pod, grow it, and then attach it back when the expand operation completed. In this version, there is no need to remove the Pod. In this short post, I’ll show a quick demonstration of how it is done. Requirements Note: This feature requires vSphere 7.0 Update 2 (U2).…

AND and OR Rules in Storage Policies

I was recently working in an environment where my vCenter server was managing two vSAN clusters, each with its own datastore. I wanted to be able to choose which datastore to provision to via storage policy, but came across some unexpected behaviour. When I configured my vSAN Rule and my Tag Rule, it seems that both datastores would appear as compliant to the policy. I found out the reason, and decided to write it up as I had never known this was how policies AND and OR rules behaved until now. Setting up Tags I created a Tags Category called…