VMware Data Services Manager – Database Creation

This is the third blog post in a series which describe how to get started with VMware Data Services Manager (DSM), a VMware solution that offers on-demand provisioning and automated management of databases on vSphere environments. In a previous installment, the deployment and configuration of the Provider appliance was discussed. In a follow up post, the steps to provision and configure an Agent were described. In this final installment related to the deployment of DSM, the addition of users is covered. So far the only user we have been dealing with is the Provider Admin. In this post, we will…

VMware Data Services Manager – Agent Deployment

After a successful deployment and configuration of the Provider appliance in my most recent post of VMware Data Service Manager, it is now time to turn our attention to the Agent appliance. This component is responsible for initiating operations on a particular vSphere cluster. An Agent can only be part of a single vSphere cluster. However, multiple agents, which are provisioned across many vSphere clusters, can all be managed from a single Provider UI. Just like the Provider appliance, the Agent is also delivered as a .OVA which is available for download from both VMware Tanzu Network and VMware Customer…

VMware Data Services Manager – Architectural Overview and Provider Deployment

In a recent post, I highlighted how VMware Data Services Manager (DSM) is designed to help vSphere Administrators control and manage the deployment of many disparate databases on their vSphere infrastructure. At the same time, I discussed how DSM is also designed to provide self-service to developers when they need to quickly provision a new database. This avoids the often prolonged ticketing system to engage IT to roll out the database on behalf of developers. In this post, I am going to take a more practical look at DSM, with a goal of rolling out the ‘Provider’ part of the…

A closer look at vSphere+ and vSAN+

At this stage, I guess that most readers will already be aware of the recent announcement around vSphere+ and vSAN+. I’m sure many readers are also aware that VMware is on a multi-cloud journey, with a goal of offering the benefits of cloud to on-premises vSphere deployments. vSphere+ and vSAN+ are some of the first steps we are taking at VMware to make this goal a reality. So what advantages does vSphere+ and vSAN+ give to customers? In this post, I will attempt to highlight some of those benefits. Centralized Management First and foremost, vSphere+ offers a new mechanism for…

Introducing VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery

At VMworld 2019, I had the pleasure of presenting our business unit’s Spotlight session with our GM, John Gilmartin (you can watch the complete recording here). One of the topics that generated a lot of interest was a low-cost Disaster Recovery (DR) service. A lot has happened in the past year but most notably was the acquisition of Datrium. Merging the original goal of a low-cost DR as a Service (DRaaS) solution alongside the smarts acquired from Datrium, we are now almost at the point where we are ready to deliver a new VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery service to our…

A closer look at EBS-backed vSAN

At VMworld 2018, we announced an initiative to use EBS, Amazon Elastic Block Store, for vSAN storage. At present vSAN is configured using the current EC2 i3 configurations, which run ESXi on bare-metal. I have seen these referred to as i3p, but my understanding is that they correlate to the i3.metal instances as shown here. The Amazon EC2 i3 instances include Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) SSD-based instance storage. These are configured with 10TB of storage per host, but there are some limitations. For one, if you wish to expand on capacity, you need to add another complete EC2 i3 instance.…

A closer look at VMware’s latest Cloud Launch

Today VMware has another cloud launch update, and this one is significant for many reasons. Our underlying goals of VMware Cloud are many. From an infrastructure perspective, the goal is to provide operational consistency no matter where the application is running, whether this is from an automation, security or governance perspective. But one thing that is often overlooked is what this operational consistency means to the developer. The goal, I feel, is to make it as simple as possible for developers to create their apps and make it as simple as possible to consume services that they might need for…