Velero vSphere Operator backup/restore TKG “guest” cluster objects in vSphere with Tanzu

Over the past week or so, I have posted a number of blogs on how to get started with the new Velero vSphere Operator. I showed how to deploy the Operator in the Supervisor Cluster of vSphere with Tanzu, and also how to install the Velero and Backupdriver components in the Supervisor. We then went on to take backups and do restores of both stateless (e.g. Nginx deployment) and stateful (e.g. Cassandra StatefulSet) which were running as PodVMs is a Supervisor cluster. In the latter post, we saw how the new Velero Data Manager acted as the interface between Velero,…

vSphere with Tanzu stateful application backup/restore using Velero vSphere Operator

Recently I wrote about our new Velero vSphere Operator. This new functionality, launched with VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 4.2, enables administrators to backup and restore objects in their vSphere with Tanzu namespaces. In my previous post, I showed how we could use the Velero vSphere Operator to backup and restore a stateless application (the example used was an Nginx deployment) to and from an S3 Object Store bucket. The S3 object store and bucket was provided by the Minio Operator that is also available in VCF 4.2 as part of the vSAN Data Persistent platform (DPp) offering. In this post,…

vSphere with Tanzu backup/restore with Velero vSphere Operator

Last week, I posted about the vSAN Data Persistence platform (DPp), a feature that is now available with VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 4.2. In that article, I went through the setup of the Minio Operator in vSphere with Tanzu, and then we created a Minio Tenant with its own S3 Object Store. In other words, we were able to assign an on-premises S3 Object Store to a vSphere with Tanzu namespace in just a few clicks, which was pretty cool. Now, one of the other Supervisor services that is available with VCF 4.2 is the Velero vSphere Operator. Many of…

Open Source Velero Plugin for vSphere (using snapshots) in action

I recently published an article around Velero and vSAN File Services, showing how Velero and the restic plugin could be used to backup and restore Kubernetes application that used vSAN File Services. Today, I want to turn my attention to a very cool new plugin that we announced in mid-April, namely the Velero Plugin for vSphere. This open source plugin enables Velero to take a crash-consistent VADP* snapshot backup of a block Persistent Volume on vSphere storage, and store the backup on S3 compatible storage. * VADP is short for VMware vSphere Storage APIs – Data Protection. To utilize the…

Using Velero to backup and restore applications that use vSAN File Service RWX file shares

It has been a while since I looked at Velero, our backup and restore product for Kubernetes cluster resources. This morning I noticed that the Velero team just published version 1.4. This article uses the previous version of Velero, version is v1.3.2. The version should not make a difference to the article. In this post, I want to see Velero backing up and restoring applications that use read-write-many (RWX) volumes that are dynamically provisioned as file shares from vSAN 7.0 File Services. To demonstrate, I’ll create two simple busybox Pods in their own namespace. Using the vSphere CSI driver, Kubernetes…

Two short video demos – CNS and Velero 1.1

I put together a few short (7 – 8 minute) videos to show off some new functionality that we’ve recently added in vSphere 6.7U3, as well as our new Velero v1.1 in action. The first video is on CNS, the VMware Cloud Native Storage feature which we included in vSphere 6.7U3. This demonstration involves the deployment of a Cassandra database on Kubernetes, which incidentally uses the new CSI (Container Storage Interface) driver for persistent volumes. Once the application is deployed, we can see the characteristics of the volumes bubbled up in vSphere. We also see how using CNS, we can…

Setting up Velero 1.0.0 to backup K8s on vSphere/PKS

I have written about Velero a few times on this blog, but I haven’t actually looked at how you would deploy the 1.0.0 version, even though it has been available since May 2019. Someone recently reached out to me for some guidance on how to deploy it, as there are a few subtle differences between previous versions. Therefore I decided to document step-by-step how to do it, but focusing on when your Kubernetes cluster is running on vSphere. I also highlight a gotcha when using Velero to backup applications that are running on Kubernetes deployed via Enterprise PKS, Pivotal Container…