vSAN File Service backed Persistent Volumes Network Access Controls [Video]

A short video to demonstrate how network access to Kubernetes Persistent Volumes, that are backed by vSAN File Service file shares, can be controlled. This allows an administrator to determine who has read-write access and who has read-only access to a volume, based on the network from which they are accessing the volume. This involves modifying the configuration file of the vSphere CSI driver, as shown in the following demonstration. The root squash parameter can also be controlled using this method. This links to a more detailed step-by-step write-up on how to configure the CSI driver configuration file and control…

vSAN File Service backed RWX Persistent Volume Quota [Video]

A short video to demonstrate how vSAN File Service file shares, which are used to back dynamically created Kubernetes read-write-many persistent volumes (PVs) have an implicit hard quota associated with them. Read-Write-Many (RXW) PVs are volumes which can be shared between multiple Kubernetes Pods. For more details about this feature, please check out this earlier blog post.

Adding Network Permissions to Kubernetes PVs backed by vSAN File Share

Last week I looked at how quotas were implicit on Kubernetes RWX Persistent Volumes which were instantiated on vSAN File Service file shares. This got me thinking about another feature of Kubernetes Persistent Volumes –  how could some of the other parameters associated with file shares be controlled? In particular, I wanted to control which networks could access a volume, what access permissions were allowed from that network and whether we could squash root privileges when a root user accesses a volume? All of these options are configurable from the vSphere client and are very visible when creating file shares…

vSAN File Service & Kubernetes PVs with an implicit quota

Earlier this week, I participated in a customer call around vSAN File Service and Kubernetes Persistent Volumes. I have highlighted the dynamic Read-Write-Many Persistent Volume feature of our vSphere CSI driver in conjunction with vSAN File Service before. Read-Write-Many (RWX) volumes are volumes that can be accessed/shared by multiple containers. During the discussion, one question came up in relation to quota, and if it can be applied to Persistent Volumes which are backed by file shares from vSAN File Service, which is the purpose of this post. Now, for those of you who are familiar with vSAN File Service, you…

Using Velero to backup and restore applications that use vSAN File Service RWX file shares

It has been a while since I looked at Velero, our backup and restore product for Kubernetes cluster resources. This morning I noticed that the Velero team just published version 1.4. This article uses the previous version of Velero, version is v1.3.2. The version should not make a difference to the article. In this post, I want to see Velero backing up and restoring applications that use read-write-many (RWX) volumes that are dynamically provisioned as file shares from vSAN 7.0 File Services. To demonstrate, I’ll create two simple busybox Pods in their own namespace. Using the vSphere CSI driver, Kubernetes…

Read-Write-Many Persistent Volumes with vSAN 7 File Services

A few weeks back, just after the vSphere 7.0 launch event, I wrote an article about Native File Services in vSAN 7.0. I had a few questions asking why we decided on NFS support in this initial release, and not something like SMB or some other protocol. The reason is quite straight-forward. We are positioning vSAN as a platform for both traditional virtual machine workloads and newer containerized workloads. We chose NFS to address a storage requirement in Kubernetes, namely a way to share Persistent Volumes between Pods. To date, the vSphere CSI driver only provisioned block based Persistent Volumes…