TKG v1.4 – Some nice new features

Over the last week or so, VMware recently announced the release of TKG version 1.4. On reading through the release notes, there were a few features that caught my eye, so I thought I would deploy a cluster and take a closer look. In particular, two features were of interest. The first of these is support for the NSX Advanced Load Balancer (ALB) service in workload clusters, which is available through the Avi Kubernetes Operator (AKO). This is applicable when TKG is deployed on vSphere. There is also new support for the NSX ALB as a control plane endpoint provider.…

vSAN File Service backed Persistent Volumes Network Access Controls [Video]

A short video to demonstrate how network access to Kubernetes Persistent Volumes, that are backed by vSAN File Service file shares, can be controlled. This allows an administrator to determine who has read-write access and who has read-only access to a volume, based on the network from which they are accessing the volume. This involves modifying the configuration file of the vSphere CSI driver, as shown in the following demonstration. The root squash parameter can also be controlled using this method. This links to a more detailed step-by-step write-up on how to configure the CSI driver configuration file and control…

Enabling Pods to pull from external image repositories in vSphere with Kubernetes

Regular readers will know that I have been spending quite a considerable amount of time recently talking about VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 4.0 and vSphere with Kubernetes, formerly known as Project Pacific. Over the past month or so, we have seen how to deploy a VCF 4.0 Management Domain. We also looked at how to create a VCF 4.0 VI Workload Domain, at the same time deploying an NSX-T 3.0 Edge Cluster to the Workload Domain which is now automated in VCF 4.0. With this all configured, we then went through the steps of deploying vSphere with Kubernetes onto this…

Automated NSX-T 3 Edge Cluster deployment in VCF 4.0 (Video)

A little while back, I wrote a post about what steps are involved in automatically deploying an NSX-T 3 Edge Cluster in VMware Cloud Foundation 4.0. I also though that it might be useful to show the steps involved in a very short video (less than 4 minutes in length). Automatic deployment of NSX-T 3 Edge clusters in VCF 4.0 is a really nice new feature, and those of us who have gone through the manual process of creating NSX-T Edge clusters can testify. Check out the video on YouTube here:

Getting started with VCF 4.0 Part 2 – Commission hosts, Create Workload Domain, Deploy NSX-T Edge

Now that a VCF 4.0 Management Domain has been deployed, we can move onto creating our very first VCF 4.0 Virtual Infrastructure Workload Domain (VI WLD). We will require a VI WLD with an NSX-T Edge cluster before we can deploy Kubernetes on vSphere (formerly known as Project Pacific). Not too much has changed in the WLD creation workflow since version 3.9. We still have to commission ESXi hosts before we can create the WLD. But something different to previous versions of VCF is that today in VCF 4.0 we can automatically provision NSX-T Edge clusters from SDDC Manager to…

Getting started with VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 4.0

On March 10th, VMware announced a range of new updated products and features. One of these was VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) version 4.0. In the following series of blogs, I am going to show you the steps to deploy VCF 4.0. We will begin with the deployment of a Management Domain. Once this is complete, we will commission some additional hosts and build our first workload domain (WLD). After that, we will deploy the latest version of NSX-T Edge Cluster to our Workload Domain. The great news here is that this part has now been automated in VCF 4.0. Finally,…

Kubernetes on vSphere 101 – Ingress

As I was researching content for the 101 series, I came across the concept of an Ingress. As I hadn’t come across it before, I wanted to do a little more research on what it actually did. It seems that in some ways, they achieve the same function as a Load Balancer in so far as they provide a mean of allowing external traffic into your cluster. But they are significantly different in how they do this. If we take the Load Balancer service type first, then for every service that is exposed via a Load Balancer, a unique external…