CNS – not just for vSAN

After a very eventful VMworld, we received lots of questions about CNS, the Cloud Native Storage feature that was released with vSphere 6.7U3. Whilst most of the demonstrations and blog articles around CNS focused on vSAN, what may have been missed is that this feature also works with both VMFS and NFS datastores. For that reason, I decided to create some examples of how CNS can also bubble up information in vSphere about Kubernetes Persistent Volumes (PVs) created on both VMFS and NFS datastores. Let’s begin by creating some simple policies to tag my VMFS datastore and my NFS datastore.…

Kubernetes Storage on vSphere 101 – NFS revisited

In my most recent 101 post on ReadWriteMany volumes, I shared an example whereby we created an NFS server in a Pod which automatically exported a File Share. We then mounted the File Share to multiple NFS client Pods deployed in the same namespace. We saw how multiple Pods were able to write to the same ReadWriteMany volume, which was the purpose of the exercise. I received a few questions on the back on that post relating to the use of Services. In particular, could an external NFS client, even one outside of the K8s cluster, access a volume from…

Kubernetes Storage on vSphere 101 – ReadWriteMany NFS

Over the last number of posts, we have spent a lot of time looking at persistent volumes (PVs) instantiated on some vSphere back-end block storage. These PVs were always ReadWriteOnce, meaning they could only be accessed by a single Pod at any one time.  In this post, we will take a look at how to create a ReadWriteMany volume, based on an NFS share, which can be accessed by multiple Pods. To begin, we will use a useful NFS server image running in a Pod, and show how to mount the exported file share to another Pod, simply to get…

NFS TCP Connections on vSphere revisited

Some time back, nearly 6 years ago in fact, I wrote about how you might hit the NFS maximum value for the number of connections you can have per IP address when mounting a lot of shares from the same NFS target. You can find the article in question here. The question came up again recently, and I found that a few things have changed since I wrote that post. In this updated post, thanks to some feedback from our NFS engineers, I wanted to revisit this scenario and explain in some further detail what the limits are. First of…

Upcoming VMUG webinar – vSphere 6.5 Core Storage

A quick note to let you know that I am co-presenting on an upcoming VMUG webinar with my good pal, Cody Hosterman, from Pure Storage. The subject is vSphere 6.5 Core Storage, and this is very much the same topic that we presented at VMworld 2017. We will cover new limits, deed dive into VMFS-6 and VAAI enhancements (including automated UNMAP), cover what’s new in NFS and iSCSI, and then finish with an overview of what we’ve done in the NVMe space. The webinar takes place on Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 11:00 AM US Central Standard Time. Cody and…

Getting to grips with NFSv4.1 and Kerberos

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been looking to update some of our older white papers on core storage topics. One of the outdated papers was on NFS, and a lot had changed in this space since the paper was last updated. Most notably, was the introduction of support for NFS v41 in vSphere 6.0, along with Kerberos based authentication. In vSphere 6.5, we also added Kerberos integrity checking. I decided to have a go at configuring this in my own lab. Before going any further, I need to thank Justin Parisi of NetApp for this guidance through this setup.…

vSphere 6.5 Core Storage White Paper Now Available

I’m delighted to announce the availability of a new vSphere 6.5 core storage white paper. The paper covers new features such as VMFS-6 enhancements, policy driven Storage I/O Control, policy driven VM Encryption, NFS and iSCSI improvements and of course new limit increases in vSphere 6.5. There are too many VMware folks to thank for putting this paper together, but you’ll find them all listed in the acknowledgements section. I do want to mention one person however; a very special thanks to Cody Hosterman of Pure Storage who spent a lot of time testing many of these new features, and…