CNS – not just for vSAN

After a very eventful VMworld, we received lots of questions about CNS, the Cloud Native Storage feature that was released with vSphere 6.7U3. Whilst most of the demonstrations and blog articles around CNS focused on vSAN, what may have been missed is that this feature also works with both VMFS and NFS datastores. For that reason, I decided to create some examples of how CNS can also bubble up information in vSphere about Kubernetes Persistent Volumes (PVs) created on both VMFS and NFS datastores. Let’s begin by creating some simple policies to tag my VMFS datastore and my NFS datastore.…

vSAN 6.7 U3 New Advanced Options

Today’s blog post highlights two new Advanced Option in vSAN 6.7 U3. The first of these is Large Cluster Support. Today, in vSAN 6.7 U3, we are now able to configure support for large vSAN clusters (i.e. clusters that are over 32 nodes in size) with a single Advanced Option. In the past, you would have needed to go to each host in the cluster and make various advanced setting changes on a host by host basis such as TcpipHeapMax. Being able to set a single cluster wide Advanced Option does simplify things very much. Below is a screenshot taken…

What’s new in vSAN 6.7U3?

With all the buzz at VMworld 2019 this week, I thought I would highlight some of the cool new features that have been introduced with vSAN 6.7U3. In this release, there are 3 areas of focus, namely Unified Management, Intelligent Operations and Enhanced Performance and Availability. Let’s take a closer look at each of these. Unified Management Cloud Native Storage The primary initiative to providing unified management is our Cloud Native Storage feature. I’ve already blogged about CNS in a previous post. This is basically giving our vSAN Administrators the ability to gain insight into both virtual machine storage as…

vSAN 6.7 U1 Deep Dive book now available in Traditional Chinese

A very short post to highlight to my Asian readers that the vSAN 6.7 U1 Deep Dive book has now been translated into Traditional Chinese by Taiwanese company DrMaster. If you are interested in picking up a copy, we have been provided with the following links to web sites where you can purchase the book. This is opportune timing, as VMware has only just announced the newest release of vSAN, version 6.7 U3. Here are the links provided by DrMaster to online book stores in Asia where the book can be found. Tenlong Computer Books. This is the most famous…

Celebrating 20,000 #vSAN Customers – Thank you

Wow – more than 20,000 vSAN customers. What an amazing journey it has been. If you haven’t seen it, vSAN license bookings grew over 50% year-over-year in Q1 with a total customer count growing to over 20,000 (seekingalpha.com). Now we need to keep the pace and, as Duncan put it, remain the number 1 player in the hyperconverged and hybrid cloud world! As a sort of thank you to everyone who helped make this happen,  Duncan and I have decided to lower the price of our vSAN Deep Dive book for 1 week. So, until Friday, June 7th, we have…

Fun with PKS, K8s, MongoDB Helm Charts and vSAN

I’ve been spending a bit of time lately look at our Heptio Velero product, and how it works with various cloud native applications. Next application on my list is MongoDB, another NoSQL database. I looked at various deployment mechanisms for MongoDB, and it seems that using Helm Charts is the most popular approach. This led me to the Bitnami MongoDB Stack Chart GitHub Repo. At this point, I did spin my wheels a little trying to get MongoDB stood up. In this post, I’ll talk through some of the gotchas I encountered. Once again, my environment is vSphere 6.7 and…

vSAN Erasure Coding Failure Handling

I had a very interesting question recently about how vSAN handles a failure in an object that is running with an erasure coding configuration. In the case of vSAN this is either a RAID-5 or a RAID-6. On vSAN, a RAID-5 is implemented with 3 data segments and 1 parity segment (3+1), with parity striped across all four components. RAID-6 is implemented as 4 data segments and 2 parity segments (4+2), again with the parity striped across all of the six components. So what happens when we need to continue writing to one of these objects after a component/segment has…