VSAN 6.0 Part 5 – new vsanSparse snapshots

There is a new snapshot format introduced in VSAN 6.0 called vsanSparse. These replace the traditional vmfsSparse format (redo logs). The vmfsSparse format was used when snapshots of VMs were taken in VSAN 5.5, and are also the format used when a snapshot is taken of a VM residing on traditional VMFS and NFS. The older vmfsSparse format left a lot to be desired when it came to performance and scalability. This KB article from our support team, indicating that no snapshot should be used for more than 72 hours, and snapshot chains should contain no more than 2-3 snapshots, speaks for itself.

This new vsanSparse snapshot format leverages features of the new (v2) on-disk format in VSAN 6.0, VirstoFS. VirstoFS is the first implementation of technology that was acquired when VMware bought a company called Virsto a number of years ago. You can get an overview of this company from this blog post I did prior to the acquisition.

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More Virtual Volumes (VVols) and Snapshots goodness

VVolsWell, I got so many questions about my previous articles on a new way of doing snapshots with VVols that I decided to take the time and get even deeper into their behaviour. In this setup, I take a Windows 2008 Guest OS running in a virtual machine  deployed on an NFS datastore, and I compare it to an identical VM deployed on a VVol datastore. This is purely from looking at how we do snapshots. Remember with VVols, snapshots always run on the base disk, compared to the traditional way of doing snapshots where the VM always run on the top-most delta in the chain.

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vSphere 5.1 Storage Enhancements – Part 7: Storage vMotion

Let’s begin this post with a recap of the Storage vMotion enhancements made in vSphere 5.0. Storage vMotion in vSphere 5.0 enabled the migration of virtual machines with snapshots and also the migration of linked clones. It also introduced a new mirroring architecture which mirrors the changed disk blocks after they have been copied to the destination, i.e. we fork a write to both source and destination using mirror mode. This means migrations can be done in a single copy operation. Mirroring I/O between the source and the destination disks has significant gains when compared to the iterative disk pre-copy changed block tracking (CBT) mechanism in the previous version & means more predictable (and shorter) migration time.

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