Virtual Volumes – A new way of doing snapshots

VVolsI learnt something interesting about Virtual Volumes (VVols) last week. It relates to the way in which snapshots have been implemented in VVols. Historically, VM snapshots have left a lot to be desired. So much so, that GSS best practices for VM snapshots as per KB article 1025279 recommends having on 2-3 snapshots in a chain (even though the maximum is 32) and to use no single snapshot for more than 24-72 hours. VVol mitigates these restrictions significantly, not just because snapshots can be offloaded to the array, but also in the way consolidate and revert operations are implemented.

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Virtual Volumes – A closer look at Storage Containers

VVolsThere are a couple of key concepts to understanding Virtual Volumes (or VVols for short). VVols is one of the key new storage features in vSphere 6.0. You can get an overview of VVols from this post. The first key concept is VASA – vSphere APIs for Storage Awareness. I wrote about the initial release of VASA way back in the vSphere 5.0 launch. VASA has changed significantly to support VVols, with the introduction of version 2.0 in vSphere 6.0, but that is a topic for another day. Another key feature is the concept of a Protocol Endpoint, a logical I/O proxy presented to a host to communicate with Virtual Volumes. My good pal Duncan writes about some considerations with PEs and queue depths here. This again is a topic for a deeper conversation, but not today. Today, I want to talk about a third major concept, a Storage Container.

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Migrations and Virtual Volumes – Deep Dive

VVolsRecently I published an article on Virtual Volumes (VVols) where I touched on a comparison between how migrations typically worked with VAAI and how they now work with VVols. In the meantime, I managed to have some really interesting discussions with some of our VVol leads, and I thought it worth sharing here as I haven’t seen this level of detail anywhere else. This is rather a long discussion, as there are a lot of different permutations of migrations that can take place. There are also different states that the virtual machine could be in. We’re solely focused on VVols here, so although different scenarios are offered up, I highlight what scenario we are actually considering.

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VSAN considerations when booting from USB/SD

This is a conversation that comes up time and time again. It’s really got to do with the following considerations when booting an ESXi host that is participating in VSAN from an SD/USB device::

  1. What should I do for persisting the vmkernel logs?
  2. What should I do about persisting the VSAN trace files?
  3. What should I do for capturing core dumps (PSOD)?

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vSphere 6.0 Storage Features Part 6: action_OnRetryErrors

In vSphere 6.0, an improvement has been made to how we handle I/O issues, such as flaky drivers, misbehaving firmware, dropped frames, fabric disruption, dodgy array firmware, and so on which can cause I/O failures. The issue is that, previously, we continually retry these sorts of I/O errors, which can lead to all sorts of additional problems. In this release we are changing our behaviour for marking a path dead.

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A closer look at SpringPath

springpathAnother hyper-converged storage company has just emerged out of stealth. Last week I had the opportunity to catch up with the team from SpringPath (formerly StorVisor), based in Silicon Valley. The company has a bunch of ex-VMware folks on-board, such as Mallik Mahalingam and Krishna Yadappanavar. Mallik and Krishna were both involved in a number of I/O related initiatives during their time at VMware. Let’s take a closer look at their new hyper-converged storage product.

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vSphere 6.0 Storage Features Part 5: Virtual Volumes

VVolsI pushed this post out a bit as I know that there is a huge amount of information out there around virtual volumes already. This must be one of the most anticipated storage features of all time, with the vast majority of our partners ready to deliver VVol-Ready storage arrays once vSphere 6.0 becomes generally available. We’ve been talking about VVols for some time now. Actually, even I have been talking about it for some time – look at this tech preview that I did way back in 2012 – I mean, it even includes a video! Things have changed a bit since that tech preview was captured, so let’s see what Virtual Volumes 2015 has in store.

Much kudos to my good friend Paudie who did a lot of this research.

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