Using NexentaConnect for file shares on VSAN

nexenta_partnerlogoI already wrote an article on the NexentaConnect for VSAN product after seeing it in action at VMworld last year. More recently, I had the opportunity to play with it in earnest. Rather than giving you the whole low-down on NexentaConnect, instead I will use this post to show the steps involved in presenting a file share built by NexentaConnect to a VM. In this case, the VM and the file share both reside on Virtual SAN. I will also show you how to simply revert to a point-in-time snapshot of the file share using NexentaConnect. To answer the common question, “can VSAN do file shares as well as storing virtual machines?”, the answer is yes. This post will show you how.

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Using HyTrust to encrypt VMDKs on VSAN

hytrustI’ve had an opportunity recently to get some hands-on with HyTrust’s Data Control product to do some data encryption of virtual machine disks in my Virtual SAN 6.0 environment. I won’t deep dive into all of the “bells and whistle” details about HyTrust – my good buddy Rawlinson has already done a tremendous job detailing that in this blog post. Instead I am going to go through a step-by-step example of how to use HyTrust and show how it prevents your virtual machine disk from being snooped. In my case, I am encrypting virtual machine disks from VMs that are deployed on VSAN, as I have had this question in the past, i.e. can VMDKs on VSAN be encrypted? The answer is yes. This post will show you how.

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My VMworld 2015 (#STO4572, #STO6228, #HOL1608)

VMW15InterimwebIs it just me, or does VMworld seem to come around quicker these days? Anyway, it is great to have a couple of sessions in again this year, and yes – you guessed it, these are VSAN sessions once again.

STO4572 – Successful Virtual SAN Evaluation/Proof-Of-Concepts

pocThis is an update on last year’s VSAN Proof-Of-Concept talk. A lot has changed in the last year, and the idea of this session is to fill you in on all the potential gotchas that you might encounter when trying to evaluate VSAN. I’ll be co-presenting this with Julienne Pham of VMware who has built up a wealth of field experience on VSAN. We’ll cover everything you need to know, including how to conduct various failure scenarios, and get the best performance. Thinking about deploying VSAN? This is one not to miss.

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The value of Virtual Volumes (VVols)

VVolsRegular readers will know that I normally blog about the technical aspects of storage, as opposed to doing opinion pieces. However there have been a number of articles published recently questioning the value of VMware’s Virtual Volumes, commonly referred to as VVols. In general, the pieces I have read ask whether or not VVols (or to be more accurate, per-VM granularity feature of VVols) adds value when NFS is already doing per-VM granularity in the form of files. The point that was missed in these pieces is that VVols is so much more than per-VM granularity. I’ve just come back from some great VMUG events in Frankfurt, Germany and Warsaw, Poland where I presented on the value of VVols to our users. I therefore thought it opportune to post about the other benefits of virtual volumes.
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vROps Management Pack for Virtual SAN

vrops-badgeVirtual SAN already has a number of features and extensions for performance monitoring and real-time diagnostics and troubleshooting. In particular, there is VSAN Observer, which is included as part of the Ruby vSphere Console (RVC). Another new feature is the Health Check Plugin, which was recently launched for VSAN 6.0. However, a lot of our VSAN customers are already using vRealize Operations Manager, and they have asked if this could be extended to VSAN, allowing them us to use a “single pane of glass” for their infrastructure monitoring. That’s just what we have done, and the beta for the vROps Management Pack for Virtual SAN is now open. You can sign up by clicking here.

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Virtual SAN – free 6 month trial – thank you VMUG

vsan-vmware-virtual-san-boxA short post again today. For those of you who are considering evaluating Virtual SAN, our friends over at the VMware User Group (VMUG) are giving you the opportunity to trial VSAN for 6 months. This offer is only available to VMUG members, but joining VMUG is free. And really, if you are not already a member of your local VMUG, shame on you. This is a great way to get hands-on experience with VSAN. What are you waiting for? Click here to get your six month trial of VSAN.

VMUGOn the topic of VMUGs, I will be presenting on VMware’s Software Defined Storage initiatives at the Germany/Deutschland West VMUG User Conference in Frankfurt on June 17th, and again at the Poland/Polska VMUG in Warsaw on June 18th. Please sign up and support your local VMUG. If you are attending either of these VMUGs, I look forward to seeing you there.

Heads Up! Horizon View 6.1 and AF-VSAN Policies

I had a query recently from a partner who was deploying VMware Horizon View 6.1 on top of an all-flash VSAN 6.0. They had done all the due diligence with configuring the AF-VSAN appropriately, marking certain flash devices as capacity devices, and so on. The configuration looked something like this:

config.jpgThe they went ahead and deployed Horizon View 6.1, which they had done many times before on hybrid configurations. They were able to successfully deploy full clone pools on the AF-VSAN, but hit a strange issue when deploying linked clone pools (floating/dedicated). The clone virtual machine operation would fail with an “Insufficient disk space on datastore” error, similar to the following:

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