Nimble Storage revisited – a chat with Wen Yu

nimble-logoNimble Storage are another company who have been making a lot of waves in the world of storage in recent years. Based in San Jose, CA, they IPO’ed earlier this year, and have something in the region of 600 employees worldwide at the present. I caught up with Wen Yu, who I have known from my early days at VMware where we worked together in the support organization. Wen moved over to Nimble a couple of years back and now is a technical evangelist at Nimble. Actually, Nimble were the subject of the very first post on this blog site when I launched it almost 2 years ago. At the time I wrote about some significant architectural updates in their 2.0 release. My understanding is that their next major release (2.1) is just around the corner. So this was a good time to chat with Wen about some new features and other things happening in the Nimble world.

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A closer look at Bull Storage Solutions

200px-Group_Bull_logoI thought it was about time that I looked at some of the larger storage vendors closer to home. One of these is of course Bull. This company is probably more familiar to those of us based in Europe rather than those of you based in the Americas or Asia Pacific. However VMware customers in EMEA will have seen them in the Solutions Exchange at VMworld Europe, where they have a reasonably large presence. After some conversation with my good pal Didier Pironet, whom I’ve met at a couple of recent VMUGs, I was introduced to Philippe Reynier who is a manager in the Bull StorWay Competence Center and Solution Center.  Philippe  provided me with a lot of good detail on Bull’s storage solutions which I will share with you here.

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A list of ESXCLI storage commands you can’t live without

There are many occasions where the information displayed in the vSphere client is not sufficient to display all relevant information about a particular storage device, or indeed to troubleshoot problems related to a storage device. The purpose of this post is to explain some of the most often used ESXCLI commands that I use when trying to determine storage device information, and to troubleshoot a particular device.

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vSphere 5.5 Storage Enhancements Part 8 – DSNRO Changes

vsphere5.5bThis is a topic which has been discussed time and time again. It relates to an advanced storage parameter called Disk.SchedNumReqOutstanding, or DSNRO for short. There are a number of postings out there on the topic, without me getting into the details once again. If you wish to learn more about what this parameter does for you, I recommend reading this post on DSNRO from my good pal Duncan Epping. Suffice to say that this parameter is related to virtual machine I/O fairness. In this post, I’ll talk about changes to DSNRO in vSphere 5.5.

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Automating the IOPS setting in the Round Robin PSP

A number of you have reached out about how to change some of the settings around path policies, in particular how to set the default number of iops in the Round Robin path selection policy (PSP) to 1. While many of you have written scripts to do this, when you reboot the ESXi host, the defaults of the PSP are re-applied and then you have to run the scipts again to reapply the changes. Here I will show you how to modify the defaults so that when you unclaim/reclaim the devices, or indeed reboot the host, the desired settings come into effect immediately.

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Pluggable Storage Architecture (PSA) Deep-Dive – Part 4

In this post, I want to look at some fail-over and load balancing specific to ALUA (Asymmetric Logical Unit Access) arrays. In PSA part 3, we took a look at the different Path Selection Plugins (PSP), but for the most part these were discussed in the context of Active/Active arrays (where the LUN is available on all paths to the array) and Active/Passive arrays (where the LUN is owned by one controller on the array, and is only visible on the paths to that controller). ALUA provides a standard way for discovering and managing multiple paths to LUNs. Prior to ALUA, hosts need to use array vendor-specific ways to inquiry target port state. ALUA Provides a standard way to allow devices to report the states of its ports to hosts. The state of ports can be used by hosts to prioritize paths and make fail-over/load balancing decisions.

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Pluggable Storage Architecture (PSA) Deep-Dive – Part 3

So far in this series, we have looked at the Pluggable Storage Architecture (PSA) and MPPs (Multipath Plugins). We have delved into the Native Multipath Plugin (NMP), and had a look at its sub-plugins, the Storage Array Type Plugin (SATP) and Path Selection Plugin (PSP). We have seen how the PSA selects an MPP, and if that MPP is the NMP, how the NMP selects an SATP and PSP.

Note – if you are having trouble following all the acronyms, you are not the first. There is a glossary at the end of the first blog post. And if we haven’t had enough acronyms, you will more recently see the plugins referred to as an MEMs, Management Extension Modules.

MEMsHowever, these names never really caught on and the original names continue to be the ones which are commonly used. The next step is to examine the SATP and PSP in more detail.

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